#9 (First Days at ER&E)

Molly: Pale translucent purple resin beads with crystal spacers highlighted by a spectacular hand-made blown glass fish pendant.
Molly: Pale translucent purple resin beads with crystal spacers highlighted by a spectacular hand-made blown glass fish pendant.
Maggie: Gorgeous oblong-shaped graduated turquoise beads form a majestic classic necklace.
Maggie: Gorgeous oblong-shaped graduated turquoise beads form a majestic classic necklace.

https://gibsongrafe.com

 Back to the continuing saga  . . .

My first day at work, they told me that the hours were 8:15 to 4:45. But then the man who was showing me around told me that all the girls left at 4:30. So for the first week or so, I would leave at 4:30. What a way to make a good first impression. It wasn’t until I got in a carpool that I realized that I been leaving early every day!

Evidently, I was very gullible. One of my assignments was to work on drawings on this very expensive paper: one layer of erasable mylar and the other fine linen. I was so impressed with the cost of this product that when I finished a drawing and had it copied, I would erase the entire mylar sheet and was ready to go on another drawing. I think they first noticed the piles of erasure dust around my desk before they told me I didn’t need to reuse each sheet.

Esso R&D was a part of Standard Oil of New Jersey and billed all of its jobs to other companies within the organization. Including computer runs. One time I really messed up a run on the IBM 7094 and it got caught in a loop and the bill for the run was $500. I was called in and told since it was my mistake that the computer run got caught in a loop, they really couldn’t bill the customer for the $500. So, it would have to deduct the charge out of my paycheck.  They must have recognized the absolute terror in my response because they told me they were just kidding. Thank goodness!

The drive from HoHoKus to Florham Park was about 40 miles on Route 46, one of the most dangerous highways in New Jersey. After a while, I got in a carpool from New York City. I met them in Paramus. My father, who I loved dearly, was the one who told me that I really should look for an apartment. Actually what had happened was that my parents were looking for an apartment in Ridgewood closer to where Mother was teaching and it was a one-bedroom apartment

The carpool itself was an adventure. The driver from NYC was an engineer named Herb Michaelson. Herb was a bachelor, really into the NYC party scene. He would read the New York Times every day, looking for parties to go to that night. He had his tuxedo ready to go at a moment’s notice. He drove a big convertible that unfortunately had a leaky cloth top, so whenever it rained, we had to take turns in the back seat bailing out the water. Sometimes, if Herb had had a particularly exhausting night, he would pull over to the side of the road and take a little nap. We would all sit there and wait till he woke up and then continue on our way.

There was another man in the carpool from NYC. For some reason, he was compelled to collect cardboard boxes. Of all sizes. We could see him coming across the parking lot with a stack of boxes. Fortunately, Herb’s car was a big one, so he fit them in somehow. Never did figure out what he did with all those boxes.

I had been hired at ER&E as an Engineering Assistant. This was perfect. I was so lucky in being assigned to some of the best and most patient engineers. Wayne Schuyler and Cliff were the best. I was assigned to the Steam Cracking Section of the Process Engineering Group. Heat and Material Balances were the bread and butter of the group. This required taking the crude assay results and plotting up the temperatures as it boiled off to determine the components in the crude.

Stay tuned for more continuing saga . . .

Meanwhile, be sure to check out our other website Susan Gibson-Grafe’s bold and beautiful jewelry: https://gibsongrafe.com

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